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20121229
20121229
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
-- >> in the u.s., president obama makes a last ditch attempt to find a budget compromise. >> in the angry and protests in the streets of regain rate. doctors warn the victim's condition is getting worse. >> and running the sydney yacht race for a sixth time. >> within the next hour, president barack obama is set to meet with top republicans to discuss the nation's looming fiscal clit. white house aides have indicated that obama will discuss measures for avoiding the rest of the automatic spending cuts and tax hikes that will bite if lawmakers fail to come up with a plan. >> pessimism remains the prevailing mood in washington as the january deadline rapidly approaches. neither democrats nor republicans have any new proposals for a workable compromise. >> the starbucks coffee chain has urged its workers in washington, d.c., area to write "come together" on the cups, a plea for party leaders to work out a compromise, but some customers say that is not enough. >> i mean, i like with starbucks is riding on the cups. i wish they would write, like, something else, like "republicans, stop being s
and for companies. there's a lot of money on the table to be used to create the kind of dynamic social safety net. the problem is we've sort of let it stay off the table in term of revenue and we can afford to provide the sort of optimal sort of career labor exchange through the government. >> that's right. and to your point, you've used the word flexible. let's take a look at who this flexibility works for. it works well for the employers, for the companies. but the rise of contingent labor, the rise of long-term unemployment and collapse of the local labor market have created incredible problems for workers. that flexibility has not worked for workers. >> there are problems that workers are experiencing that probably due to globalization and other things, it's causing a bad scene for workers in general. but these developments aren't necessarily making it worse. they are just going along with the badness there. like, for example -- >> i don't know about that. there are 64,000 workers in georgia who are going into christmas just having been kicked out of earned unemployment benefits. why? because
take very seriously. i hope i don't finish this. this term, this year, my life to my being useful. i want to be useful. on my tombstone, he was useful. live the long time. i want to be useful. it i don't want just to say the words, i want to make a difference. >> you already are. i think you on behalf of not only a library of congress and the children's book council and every child, but on behalf of the audience and for our country , the wonderful job your doing. walter dean myers a round of applause. [applause] >> thank you. >> we continue our coverage of the international summit of the book with the panel tell the role of cultural institutions and foster in the future of the book. this is about 50 minutes. >> we are coming to the second session of our day which would be a panel discussion on the role of cultural ostentations and posturing and the future of the book. i will turn to the panel's moderator to introduce the panelists once we are all on stage. sir harold is a distinguished feature in publishing in journalism. i'm sure you've heard of him. president and publisher of rando
that was and the challenges facing us in 2013. first to our big stories of 2012. and america's left turn from the supreme court's landmark health care decision to the reelection of president barack obama. and politics headed in a decidedly liberal direction, so what happened and what does it mean for the country going forward. joining us columnist and detail editor, dani henninger and kim strassel. dan, we like to say for a long time we live in a center-right country. if you look at the last two presidential elections that doesn't seem to be the case. are we living now in a new, progressive era? >> in terms of the presidency, i think we are, paul. i'm not sure about the country. barack obama i think is the center left or left wing president since the great depression and i think that what barack obama has in mind to do is indeed to redistribute income from the top downward, not to cut spending, but to increase spending, it's explicit from a 20% of gdp to 25% gdp and rather than cut spending raise taxes as necessary to support that spending and i would say that is in fact essentially the french model. and
shut at 1:30 in the afternoon and open again at 5:00 p.m. carlows also uses that break for a nap, for now at least. -- carlos. >> i think soon we will have to stay open after lunch. this is a tourist area. we have to stay open because it is customer friendly even though a lot of people are against it. but business is business. >> to make sure tourists in particular are not faced with shuttered doors, the spanish government has changed laws regarding business hours. it wants visitors to the crisis- ridden country to have more time to spend money -- 90 hours a week instead of 72. >> it should help encourage trade and create more jobs in the sector. >> but the plans are threatening the siesta. the tradition of the lengthy break to unwind and relax is being sacrificed to the demands of the market. the spanish siesta was introduced in response to extreme working conditions. during the post-war period, it was not just the afternoon heat that force people to take a break. >> a lot of people had to take on two jobs at the same time. it was the only way to divide up the day so that you re
shows that american workers are not using up all of the vacation time. they are said to be seen as lazy and losing their job. this is a good sign for the economy. how so, steve. not for those two reasons . we don't have too much vacation or little. we do it just right. europe had work like we did. you want lopping beer vacation you can have a stagnant economy like europe. we raise taxes we'll have longer vacation but fewer jobbings. >> you are right. we don't want to be like the french. and people here in the united states and government union. and i was on vacation and check my blackberry and read a rick unger e-mail while on vacation. >> you are never on vacation. >> you work it anyway. nine out of the 10 are checking their work phones. any time to rejuvenate and come back ragged. >> we need that vacation time to work better. >> when you say economy you are talking about gdp. good or ill it is major transaction. have everyone never talk a day off and work 60 hours a week. steve is protesting that. >> there is it a correlation between vacation time and increased productivity. a 2010 st
at large and michael duffy, executive editor for time magazine chronicle the relationship between the u.s. presidents in the president's club in side the world's most exclusive fraternity. political commentator kevin phillips recounts what he believes was the most important year of the american revolution which was 1775, a good year for revolutions. for an extended list of links to various publications, 2012 novel book selections visit the book tv website, booktv.org or our facebook page facebook.com/booktv . >> up next on book tv, richard wolff and david bersamian talk about our economic crisis and argue that it can be traced back to the 1970's when our economic system shifted from benefiting a vast majority of americans to one which mostly benefits only the very rich. this is about an hour-and-a-half. [applause] >> good to see you will hear. let's cut quickly to the chase. what is it and the dna of capitalism that makes this so unstable? >> since the beginning of economics as a discipline back in the days of adam smith and david mccarty who were the first to develop it as a comprehensiv
paragraph of euro bit wear. >> my obituary. >> what would you want us to say? would music be in the first sentence or two? >> no, i will say exactly what i said to the meerning extras. many singers. here lies ricardo muti, a crazy man that spent all his life trying to find a correct qafer or quarter note. >> rose: in pursuit of that your life was. >> that is a disaster. >> rose: but music has been good to you. >> very, very good. you know, music is the only art. and i know this by experience that can bring people together. and make people to communicate even if they don't speak the same language, if they have different religions. so when you left lascala, why did you leave? >> as i said, i was there for 19 years, longer than anybody elsement longer even than tuscanini and my relationship with the orchestra and chorus has been always for 19 years perfect. then when i had a fight with the administration, let's say, because i don't want to indicate this or that person, then everything became political. and in italy when something becomes political, and controversial, politically speaking the
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)